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in the cyberworld. technology drives everything we do the world wide web has made us more interconnected than at any time in our human history. the vast majority of our emperor structure resides in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure in the united states reside in the private sector. the national security risks and economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with all of our partners. our partners of the private sector. for those, but the work of the government or private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desired is. this private sector holds a lot of data. these assets are pretty profound. their protection to the united states priorities is of national importance. the president declared recently, and i quote, here is a list of priorities, this is in the top five. the cyber threat is one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face as a nation and america's economic prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cyber security.
of government response, that technology is really just a piece of the answer. you need to have technology on your networks help identify when there's a breach to give you much greater understanding about what's happening on your networks, to look for these intrusions and these incursions into your network. that is a piece of the solution, and part of it is the caller said is really having the discussion with nations that are aggressively pursuing this. there are dozens of countries have these electronic espionage capabilities in place. a specific programs where they're targeting western networks exfiltrate data to empower their private sector, to empower their manufacturing base, the retail base, the research and development programs. they're doing at the expense of the american taxpayer. >> host: where is congress on the cybersecurity legislation? >> guest: there are more than 40 bills right now that are on the hill. covering a whole range of cybersecurity issues. some of these bills have been bouncing around for five years or more. and i recognize understand it's an incredibly complex i
to bring in new technology. i've got to bring in the uab. fought to bring in the excess equipment from iraq and afghanistan after coming back. we are doing all this. we have to work together. >> i appreciate your efforts. the message being undermined to allow those new resources to happen in to get what we need when we give mixed messages. last year, you have a press release that said the u.s. has not seen any spillover violence. saying that when we are acknowledging that our law enforcement has been engaged in a gun battle. we have had people killed. narcotics have been caught. that is what is competing this. we need to recognize it for what it is. transnational criminal organizations -- we cannot pursue them across the international border. we will put what ever it takes to defend the sovereignty -- >> he made a point that there was a bill to fund more border patrol agents. i think it is well-known that republicans in washington do not like to spend a lot of money. his comments were that members of your own party do not want to fund this initiative. >> people are tired of blaming parties.
on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education will ensure the united states remains global competitive force in the marketplace. people across our nation are working together to create a better world, and it's important their efforts be recognized and supported. i encourage my colleagues to join me in recognizing the benefits and goals of the mathematics of planet earth project. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? >> i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise to urge my colleagues here in the house of representatives and citizens all across the united states to join in an unambiguous message to support israel in this time of great and dramatic concern and rising tensions in the gaza strip. look, the facts are clear. the 400 rocket that have been launched into -- from gaza into israel over the last 48 hours represent a dramatic provocation of israel and its people. second,
, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the downfall of david petraeus showed no sign of fading into the background today. instead, there was every indication that his admission of adultery will echo far beyond the end of his career at the c.i.a. >> a personal scandal forces c.i.a. director david petraeus to... >> i want to start out with this out of the blue thunder bolt that hit washington friday. >> brown: all weekend in washington the details kept coming along with more questions. after david petraeus' sudden resignation on friday because he had had an extra marital affair quickly revealed to involve his biographer paula broadwell. her book came out last january. appearing on c-span she recalled first meeting petraeus several years earlier. >> he came to harvard university where i was a g
and that helped. it's the spirit and technology of the internet. >> and i suppose everybody saw this going on amazon.com and look at every binders in the thousands and thousands of comments. this finder just doesn't hope my comments. >> priority for standardized effect is. there are no women in it. >> was speaking associate media, one of the questions is prompted by treat from election evening. when we realize we had part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that su
of reasons related to technology, related to globalization. and what i think is important about the proposal is that by asking the top 2% to pay more, that will provide more opportunity to have others have the same type of changes they had. what is the extra revenue going to be used for? to help keep student loan rates low. it's going to be used to provide stem education, science, technology, math metic, engineering education for more individuals to have the kinds of opportunities that have knead possible for so many americans to thrive. and if you look what is happened to the distribution of income in the u.s. over the last thirty years, we have seen the top pull away. it's wonderful they have done so well. what's important is that we pursue the policy that will reduce this opportunity gap and provide nor opportunity for those from the middle and lower income families. >> do you think that ten years from today our budget deficit is likely to be under $500 billion a year? what would you project the budget deficit going to be? we're running a $1.1 trillion right now. where do you think it wil
. if you talk to some very high technology firms, they will say, sorry, we cannot find enough specialized mathematician's or specialized engineers or an agricultural worker will say we have 7.9% unemployment but i cannot find enough people to help me take care of my harvest. we have 7.9% unemployment, but we do not have enough people in the transportation and logistics arena. perhaps high school kids -- high-school graduates do not want to be truckdrivers these days. they do not want to go back to the farm. it is not totally even. there is evidence that suggests very strongly that immigrants actually take up the slack. they do not compete necessarily with jobs already taken. another of many advantages of legalizing is that wages will have to go up. they will have to formally pay taxes, formally pays social security. the system will be level. there is one thing you said that i think at the core of this. i think it is and a wonderful insight. as the government is getting larger -- and the government is getting larger. the government has grown a four percentage points of gdp in the last four
for assistance, for r and d, science and technology. there is a whole panoply of means by which we will rebalance. ships are important, but there is so much more as we look forward to the future, and we need to requirements of our shuja guidance in this regard. having laid that out, i commend that to you as our future, and how we see things today. as we prepare a budget for the fiscal year 2014, it is to support this very effort i mentioned to you. we are on track and prepare to meet our national security commitment in this regard, and the defense strategic guidance. that you very much, and i look forward to your questions. [applause] >> or article speaks about balancing the force. how international ladies played into your strategy? >> the international ladies played into the strategy of my mission, and by the alliance is that we have had. let me speak to the alliance. i spoke to the western pacific. the japanese maritime self- defense force plays -- we cooperate with them to share what we call long-range search and track mission there in the western pacific. what the navies of the republic of ko
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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